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Basic Concepts

  • Demetri P. Telionis
Chapter
  • 194 Downloads
Part of the Springer Series in Computational Physics book series (SCIENTCOMP)

Abstract

This chapter could also be termed “general introduction” since it contains material of basic, introductory character, which is well documented and relatively familiar to fluid dynamicists. Elementary concepts of methods of computation are also included, which should be familiar to the reader. The material is therefore presented parsimoniously with references to other sources for more details. Most of the sections in this chapter contain basic ideas and equations that will serve as the starting point for the derivations described in the following chapters.

Keywords

Steady Flow Unsteady Flow Solid Boundary Adverse Pressure Gradient Characteristic Plane 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Demetri P. Telionis
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Engineering Science and MechanicsVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State UniversityBlacksburgUSA

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