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Regulation of Deciduous Forest Litter Decomposition by Soil Arthropod Feces

  • D. P. Webb
Part of the Proceedings in Life Sciences book series (LIFE SCIENCES)

Abstract

Soil invertebrates may consume 20–100% of annual litter input and in so doing produce an immense amount of excrement (Kurcheva, 1960; Jongerius, 1963; Anderson and Healey, 1970).

Keywords

Leaf Litter Litter Decomposition Soil Animal Parent Litter Litter Leachate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag, New York, Inc. 1977

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  • D. P. Webb

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