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On the structure of viruses and their function as pathogens

Conference paper

Abstract

In the early 1930: s the biochemists invaded the field of virus research and Stanley was able, by means of established biochemical methods, to purify and crystallize the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and to determine its chemical character. His results formed the basis for a concept of viruses as giant nucleoprotein molecules. This concept was vividly contested by, among others, Burnet in his book “Virus as organism”. Now we know that viruses have too complex a structure to be considered as molecules and are yet in many respects clearly distinct from the microorganisms. Viruses are neither molecules nor organisms, they are just viruses.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1967

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Gard

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