Organic Geochemistry of Coal

  • B. S. Cooper
  • D. G. Murchison

Abstract

Organic geochemical studies of coals provide an ideal opportunity for the combination of petrological methods with chemical procedures, since appropriate microscopical techniques will usually establish the presence of many of the petrographic constituents, even in severely altered coals. The considerable progress in the chemical and petrological fields of coal research during the past twenty-five years was stimulated by the urgent need for coal as an energy source in the period immediately following World War II. The solid fuels of greatest economic importance and on which most research effort has been expended are the “hard coals”, a term encompassing the bituminous coals, the semianthracites and the anthracites. This chapter is primarily concerned with the organic geochemistry of such coals. Although chemical-petrological correlations are less well established for the more immature fuels, brief reference will also be made here to the geochemistry of brown coals and peats.

Keywords

Cellulose Geochemistry Petrol Miocene Bark 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1969

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. S. Cooper
    • 1
  • D. G. Murchison
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of GeologyUniversity of Newcastle upon TyneEngland

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