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Neurobiology pp 248-263 | Cite as

Estimation of Biogenic Amines in Biological Tissues

  • R. G. H. Downer
  • B. A. Bailey
  • R. J. Martin
Part of the Proceedings in Life Sciences book series (LIFE SCIENCES)

Abstract

The availability of appropriate analytical procedures is of fundamental importance in achieving a holistic understanding of the biochemistry and physiology of biogenic amines in animals. Ideally, the analytical procedure should provide sensitive quantitation of specific compounds and should permit routine processing of relatively large numbers of samples without the need for expensive instrumentation. A variety of techniques have been used to analyze biogenic amines and these are discussed below with particular emphasis placed on the estimation of catecholamines, indoleamines, and monohydroxy-phenolamines in a single sample. The use of high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection is discussed in some detail and procedures for sample preparation and extraction of monoamines are also described.

Keywords

High Performance Liquid Chromatography Biological Tissue Biogenic Amine High Performance Liquid Chromatography Column American Cockroach 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. G. H. Downer
  • B. A. Bailey
  • R. J. Martin
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiologyUniversity of WaterlooWaterlooCanada

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