Oils and Fats

  • F. Leslie Hart
  • Harry Johnstone Fisher

Abstract

There is no sharp chemical or nutritional distinction between oils and fats. Most of these products go through some sort of refining process before they enter commerce as foodstuffs. (Olive oil is the only vegetable oil that is not refined before being consumed.) At this stage they consist largely of saponifiable triglycerides of straight-chain aliphatic saturated and unsaturated “fatty acids” insoluble in water, with a very small proportion, 3 percent or less, of other substances (phospholipids, sterols, tocopherols, carotenoids, vitamins and coloring matter). In common parlance, oils are those products that are liquid at ambient temperature, while fats are solids. They may be of animal or vegetable origin. In this text “oil” includes “fat” as a generic term except when the context indicates otherwise.

Keywords

Cholesterol Corn Hexane Acid Value Turbidity 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1971

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. Leslie Hart
    • 1
  • Harry Johnstone Fisher
    • 2
  1. 1.U.S. Food and Drug AdministrationBoston DistrictUSA
  2. 2.The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment StationNew HavenUSA

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