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Introduction—General methods for proximate and mineral analysis

  • F. Leslie Hart
  • Harry Johnstone Fisher

Abstract

Proximate analysis is defined by H. Bennett in the Concise Chemical and Technical Dictionary as the “determination of a group of closely related components together, e. g. total protein, fat.” It conventionally includes determinations of the amount of water, protein, fat (ether extract), ash and fiber, with nitrogen-free extract (sometimes termed Nifext) being estimated by subtracting the sum of these five percentages from 100. In order to emphasize the group nature of the percentage of protein, fat and fiber, many chemists use the word “crude” before these three terms.

Keywords

Crude Fiber Mineral Analysis Steam Bath Glycol Monomethyl Ether Ethylene Glycol Monomethyl Ether 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1971

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. Leslie Hart
    • 1
  • Harry Johnstone Fisher
    • 2
  1. 1.U.S. Food and Drug AdministrationBoston DistrictUSA
  2. 2.The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment StationNew HavenUSA

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