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Phenomenological-Anthropological Preconditions and Method of the Investigation

  • Gerhard Bosch

Abstract

To start with, we would like to return to Minkowski’s criticism of the one-sided view of autism as a turning inwards to an inner life, and we also want to go back to the analogy between “inside” and “outside” and the “inside” and “outside” of the body. In particular, it is important for the investigation of early-infantile autism that Minkowski’s consistently worked-out theory of the disturbance of the “contact vital avec la réalité” juxtaposes an active, energetic, relatively unimaginative type with the “passive, wildly imaginative autistic type” to whom until then most attention had been paid. Taking the degree of imagination as a standard, he talks of an “autisme riche” and an “autisme pauvre”. This “autisme pauvre”, which is characterized by an object-centred activity directed to goals in the outside world, is termed autistic despite the “being-in-the-world” of the activity, for it is directed to only one goal, as if the person in question were blinkered and looked neither right nor left; the pattern of connections, in which such activity would normally be a link, is clearly missing.

Keywords

Autistic Child Glass Wall Infantile Autism Common World Cartesian Meditation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag, Berlin · Heidelberg 1970

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gerhard Bosch
    • 1
  1. 1.Rheinische Landesklinik für JugendpsychiatrieUniversity of DüsseldorfViersen-SüchtelnDeutschland

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