Cardiovascular Risks Associated with Oral Contraceptives

  • Lothar A. J. Heinemann
  • Edeltraut Garbe

Abstract

Methods of steroid hormone contraception have been available since the 1960s and are now thought to be used by more than 100 million women worldwide [I]. The overwhelming majority of women use steroid hormone contraceptives in their oral application. One can estimate that, currently, 93 million women are users of combined oral contraceptives (OCs).

Keywords

Manifold Europe Migraine Gall Smoke 

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lothar A. J. Heinemann
  • Edeltraut Garbe

There are no affiliations available

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