Blast Waves

  • Gilbert Ford Kinney
  • Kenneth Judson Graham

Abstract

An important aspect of any large explosion in air is the blast wave that it forms. This blast wave is generated when the atmosphere surrounding the explosion is forcibly pushed back, as by the gases produced from a conventional chemical explosive, or as furnished by a volatilized container and components in a nuclear explosion, or from the atmosphere itself when a portion is subjected to a sudden energy release as in a lightning flash.

Keywords

Explosive Rounded 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gilbert Ford Kinney
    • 1
  • Kenneth Judson Graham
    • 2
  1. 1.U. S. Naval Postgraduate SchoolMontereyUSA
  2. 2.Naval Weapons CenterChina LakeUSA

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