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Regulation and consequences of the mobilization of lipids from adipose tissue

  • Lars A. Carlson
Part of the Symposion der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Endokrinologie book series (ENDOKRINOLOGIE, volume 12)

Abstract

Lipids are continously mobilized from adipose tissue in the form of free fatty acids (FFA) into blood plasma. The physiological importance of FFA is easily appreciated if one realizes that in the fasting state more than 50 per cent of the energy consumption is covered by oxidation of FFA. The clinical significance of FFA should be considered against the fact that in several diseases we have excessively high levels of FFA in the blood. Clinical and physiological aspects of FFA mobilization have been reviewed in detail elsewhere (1). In connection with endocrine aspects it may be pertinent to mention here that hyperthyroidism, pheochromocytoma and diabetes are examples of conditions where we usually encounter high FFA levels in blood.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1967

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lars A. Carlson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Internal MedicineKarolinska Sjukhuset and King Gustaf Vth Research InstituteStockholmSweden

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