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Mitogenic Activity of Polynucleotides on Thymus-Influenced Lymphocytes

  • Arthur G. Johnson
  • Ihn H. Han

Abstract

An adjuvant effect on antibody synthesis of isologous or heterologous nucleic acids has been known for some time (Jaroslow and Taliaferro, 1956; Merritt and Johnson, 1965). With the recent rapid acquisition of more precise knowledge as to how the immune system functions, the groundwork has been laid to define the cell types and the intracellular biochemical events affected by this adjuvant. In initiating investigation on this aspect, we have studied (Johnson et al., 1971) the characteristics of a nontoxic (Han et al., 1973), double-stranded homoribopolymer, polyadenylic acid complexed to polyuridylic acid (poly A:U). Similar efforts have emerged from Dr. Werner Braun’s laboratory (Braun et al., 1971), with a concentration on experiments linking the poly A:U effect to activation of cyclic AMP in spleen cells (Ishizuka et al., 1971). In our laboratory, we have postponed measurements of cyclic AMP, electing first to define the precise cell type affected by this adjuvant.

Keywords

Spleen Cell Antibody Formation Mitogenic Activity Mitogenic Effect Tritiated Thymidine 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arthur G. Johnson
  • Ihn H. Han

There are no affiliations available

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