Nutrient-Hydrologic Interactions (Eastern United States)

  • G. E. Likens
  • F. H. Bormann
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 10)

Abstract

Aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems within the same landscape are linked directly by water moving in the hydrologic cycle. Thus the connection between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems is a functional one, and the ecological consequences of this linkage are profound. A vital characteristic of ecosystem function is the continuous flow of nutrients and energy through the system. An ecosystem has a richly detailed budget of inputs and outputs; one reason it is difficult to assess the impact of human activities on landscapes or the biosphere is the lack of precise information about these inputs and outputs and about the delicate adjustments that maintain a balance.

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© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. E. Likens
  • F. H. Bormann

There are no affiliations available

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