Exploiting Structure in Constraint Satisfaction Problems

  • Eugene C. Freuder
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NATO ASI F, volume 131)

Abstract

Constraint satisfaction problems (CSPs) involve finding values for problem variables subject to restrictions on which combinations of values are allowed. Fig. 2.1a presents an example: color the graph shown such that no vertices joined by an edge have the same color. The small letters indicate the choice of colors available at each vertex (a stands for aquamarine if you like). Here the variables are the vertices, the values for each variable are the set of colors available at the vertex and the constraints all happen to be the same: “not same color”. This is a binary CSP because all constraints involve two variables. For simplicity, we will assume here that our problems are presented as binary CSPs.

Keywords

Assure 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eugene C. Freuder
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of New HampshireDurhamUSA

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