Driver Scheduling Using Intelligent Estimation Techniques with Heuristic Searches

  • Raymond S. K. Kwan
  • Anthony Wren
  • Li Ping Zhao
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Economics and Mathematical Systems book series (LNE, volume 386)

Abstract

Public transport driver scheduling is a complex problem because the number of possible schedules is usually astronomical and the rules regarding legality and quality of duties are often many, ill-defined, and conflicting. This paper describes some research into using Knowledge Based Systems (KBS) for overcoming these difficulties. The study has led to a new approach to driver scheduling. In this new approach, an intelligent duty estimator is used every time a duty is formed. Corrective actions are taken if the new estimate is different from before. The work on the new approach as currently evolved is outlined.

Keywords

Transportation 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Raymond S. K. Kwan
    • 1
  • Anthony Wren
    • 1
  • Li Ping Zhao
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Computer StudiesUniversity of LeedsLeedsUK

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