Development of computer tools for machine learning of generic reactions starting with specific reactions

  • Gérard Kaufmann
  • Philippe Jauffret
  • Christian Tonnelier
  • Thierry Hanser
Conference paper

Abstract

The reasonings in organic synthesis often are of analogical type: try to adapt to a new situation, processes already described in previous cases. This is easily conceivable, if one considers there are, in chemistry, few general rules without exceptions which can provide a widely usable theoretic model.

Keywords

Bromine Halogen 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Bibliography

  1. [1]
    P. Jauffret, C. Laurenco, G. Kaufmann T.S.I., 1986, 5, 375–390. English translation: T.S.I., 1987, 6, 129–143.Google Scholar
  2. [2]
    P. Jauffret Thesis, Université de Nancy 1, 1987.Google Scholar
  3. [3]
    Documentation transmitted by Alfons Weise.Google Scholar
  4. [4]
    C.S. Wilcox, R.A. Levinson, ‘Artificial Intelligence Application in Chemistry’, T.H. Pierce & B.A. Hohne Ed., ACS symp. ser. 306, New York, 1986, 209–230.Google Scholar
  5. [5]
    W. Sieber ‘Artificial Intelligence: Towards practical applications’, T. Bernold & C. Albers Ed., 1985, 105–107.Google Scholar
  6. [6]
    P. Azario, R. Barone, M. Chanon J. Org. Chem., 1988, 53, 720–724.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. [7]
    G. Levi Calcolo 1972, 9, 341–342.Google Scholar
  8. [8]
    C. Tonnelier DEA report, Université de Strasbourg 1, 1987.Google Scholar
  9. [9]
    E. Moussa Vi-Hannicq Thesis, Université de Strasbourg 1, 1989.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gérard Kaufmann
    • 1
  • Philippe Jauffret
    • 1
  • Christian Tonnelier
    • 1
  • Thierry Hanser
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratoire de Modèles Informatiques Appliqués è la SynthèseUniversité Louis PasteurStrasbourgFrance

Personalised recommendations