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Regional Cerebral Blood Flow After Cryoinjury of the Rabbit Brain

  • R. Murr
  • L. Schürer
  • S. Berger
  • O. Kempski
  • A. Baethmann
Conference paper

Abstract

Head injury or ischemia induces focal cerebral lesions with subsequent development of brain edema. The pathological water accumulation may affect CBF in surrounding areas (Frei et al. 1973). Impairments of the local oxygen supply may then result in further damage to the brain. A rabbit model was established in this laboratory to characterize the spatial and time-dependent changes of rCBF and of the brain surface oxygen partial pressure (tissue PO2) after focal cold injury to the brain.

Keywords

Brain Edema Regional Cerebral Blood Flow Contralateral Hemisphere Tissue Perfusion Regional Local Brain Injury 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Murr
    • 1
  • L. Schürer
    • 2
  • S. Berger
    • 2
  • O. Kempski
    • 2
  • A. Baethmann
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of AnesthesiologyLudwig-Maximilians-University, Klinikum GroßhadernMünchen 70Germany
  2. 2.Institute for Surgical ResearchLudwig-Maximilians-University, Klinikum GroßhadernMünchen 70Germany

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