Immunity and Tolerance in Amphibia

  • Edwin L. Cooper
Part of the Recent Results in Cancer Research book series (RECENTCANCER, volume 1969)

Abstract

This section of the symposium will treat immunity and tolerance in Amphibia presenting adult information in all three orders and in larvae where available. The data will be presented as a review of immunity to transplantation antigens, as information pertaining to antibody and immunoglobulin synthesis, and as lymphomyeloid organ control of immunity. This paper is not intended to be an exhaustive account of the subject which would list every known reference, but where feasible pertinent comprehensive reviews are presented. Lastly the information will be considered in light of cancerogenesis.

Keywords

Filtration Albumin Haas Lymphosarcoma 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1969

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edwin L. Cooper
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Anatomy, School of MedicineUniversity of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA

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