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Conversion with Polynucleotides of a Genetically Controlled Low Immune Response to a High Response in Mice Immunized with a Synthetic Polypeptide Antigen

  • Edna Mozes
  • G. M. Shearer
  • Michael Sela
  • Werner Braun

Abstract

During the past few years a number of investigations have demonstrated that genetics plays a significant role in the ability of several animal species to elicit immune responses to a variety of antigens (McDevitt and Benacerraf, 1969). Results of experiments using synthetic polypeptides of restricted heterogeneity indicated that antibody responses of mice to these types of immunogens were controlled by dominant, quantitative, autosomal genes (McDevitt and Sela, 1965, 1967; Pinchuck and Maurer, 1968; Mozes et al., 1969 a, 1969 b). In view of the complexity of the cellular events involved in immune processes, it is possible that certain genetic controls are expressed at the cellular level. Hence, genetic controls could affect any of a number of cell-mediated steps.

Keywords

Marrow Cell Genetic Control Spleen Cell Sheep Erythrocyte High Responder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1971

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edna Mozes
    • 1
    • 2
  • G. M. Shearer
    • 1
    • 2
  • Michael Sela
    • 1
    • 2
  • Werner Braun
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Chemical ImmunologyThe Weizmann Institute of ScienceRehovotIsrael
  2. 2.The Institute of MicrobiologyRutgers UniversityNew BrunswickUSA

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