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Lactoferrin Content in Feces in Ileostomy-operated Children Fed Human Milk

  • L. Hambraeus
  • G. Hjorth
  • B. Kristiansson
  • H. Hedlund
  • H. Andersson
  • B. Lönnerdal
  • L.-B. Sjöberg

Abstract

Lactoferrin (LF) is the major iron-binding protein in human milk, but it also occurs in other body fluids, e.g., tears, saliva and pancreatic juice. Human milk is unusually rich in lactoferrin which constitutes one of the three dominating whey proteins, the others being α-lactalbumin and secretory IgA [5]. Lactoferrin has been shown to inhibit the growth of microorganisms in vitro [2] but so far there is meager information regarding the bacteriostatic effect in vivo.

Keywords

Human Milk Pancreatic Juice Necrotizing Enterocolitis Bacteriostatic Effect Immunochemical Method 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Dr. Dietrich Steinkopff Verlag GmbH & Co. KG, Darmstadt 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. Hambraeus
    • 1
  • G. Hjorth
    • 1
  • B. Kristiansson
    • 2
  • H. Hedlund
    • 2
  • H. Andersson
    • 3
  • B. Lönnerdal
    • 4
  • L.-B. Sjöberg
    • 5
  1. 1.Dept. of NutritionUniversity of UppsalaSweden
  2. 2.Dept. of PediatricsÖstra SjukhusetGothenburgSweden
  3. 3.Dept. of Clinical NutritionSahlgren’s HospitalGothenburgSweden
  4. 4.Dept. of NutritionUniversity of CaliforniaDavisUSA
  5. 5.Semper ABStockholmSweden

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