DNA In Synovial Fluid and Circulation of Patients with Arthritis

  • G. E. Ehrlich
  • S. A. Leon
  • M. Revach
  • R. Adler
  • V. Peterson
  • B. Shapiro
Conference paper
Part of the Verhandlung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Rheumatologie book series (DGR, volume 7)

Abstract

Despite the refinement of diagnosis and treatment of arthritis, prognosis remains elusive. In an earlier study, we reported that the sera of patients who had rheumatoid arthritis contained detectable amounts of native DNA, in some cases accompanied by low levels of anti-nDNA antibodies (1). The highest levels of nDNA correlated with increasing severity, relatively short duration, and seronegativity. The source of the nDNA remained unknown. It had been hypothesized that antigens locally produced in the synovium, including DNA, would form immune complexes with their respective antibodies and trigger the complement cascade. The results should be chemotaxis, ingestion of complexes, and release of ferments that could worsen the inflammation. While such a sequence may well fit rheumatoid arthritis, there is the possibility that other forms of arthritis also could have an immune mechanism in their causation.

References

  1. 1.
    Leon, S.A., Ehrlich, G. E., Shapiro, B., Labbate, V.: Free DNA in the serum of rheumatoid arthritis patients. J. Rheumatol. 4, 139–143 (1977).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Leon, S.A., Green, A., Yaros, M.J., Shapiro, B.: Radioimmunoassay for nanogram quantities of DNA. J. Immunol. 9, 157–164 (1975).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Dr. Dietrich Steinkopff Verlag GmbH & Co. KG, Darmstadt 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. E. Ehrlich
    • 1
  • S. A. Leon
    • 1
  • M. Revach
    • 1
  • R. Adler
    • 1
  • V. Peterson
    • 1
  • B. Shapiro
    • 1
  1. 1.The Hahnemann Medical College and Hospital und Albert Einstein Medical CenterPhiladelphiaUSA

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