What Does Pharmaceutical Industry Expect of Patenting Human Genes and Living Organisms?

  • B. Garthoff
Conference paper
Part of the Veröffentlichungen aus der Heidelberger Akademie der Wissenschaften book series (HD AKAD, volume 1993/94 / 1994/1)

Abstract

In a world of fears regarding gene technology where a novel, respectively film such as “Jurassic Parc” (by M. Crichton, [1]) determine peoples’ attitude towards gene sequencing, the rational discours of whether to patent human genes or those of living organisms seems almost impossible.

Keywords

Europe Jurassic Erythropoietin 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Garthoff

There are no affiliations available

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