Advertisement

Electrophysiologic Pattern and T-Cell Subsets in Bell’s Palsy

  • A. Formenti
  • M. Galli
  • G. Termine
  • M. Corbellino
  • N. Massetto
Conference paper

Abstract

The etiology of Bell’s palsy (BP) is as yet undefined. Among the candidates are various infectious agents and in particular viruses ubiquitous in distribution and with persistence and/or latency sites in nervous cells as herpes virus [1–3]. Besides alterations in the humoral arm of the immune system, with an increase of circulating immune complexes [4], signs of activation in the cellular compartment are described [5–8]. These findings may be indirect clues directing us towards an infectious agent. Nevertheless autoimmune phenomena have also been suspected, such as in sudden hearing loss and in other inner ear disturbances [9]. The natural history of Bell’s palsy is on the other hand quite protean, suggesting a variety of pathogenetic events, all leading ultimately to nerve damage but with different outcomes. Immunologic alterations observed at onset and during BP show a relevant degree of variability that evidently emerge when large case files are considered. In our research we investigated a possible correlation between evoked SR and ENoG that gives clues to the outcome and degree of nerve impairment [10], and the determination of lymphocyte subsets. The aim of this study was to consider whether such an approach could allow us to identify subcategories of BPs, differing on the basis of prognosis and laboratory findings.

Keywords

Facial Nerve Herper Zoster Lyme Disease Sensorineural Hearing Loss Sudden Hearing Loss 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Adour KK, Byl FM, Nilsinger, RL., (1978) The true nature of Bell’s palsy: analysis of 1000 consecutive patients. Laryngoscope 88: 787–901PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Clark JR, Carlson RD, Sasaki CT, Steere, AC., (1985) Facial paralysis in Lyme disease. Laryngoscope 95: 1341–1345PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Fleury H, Chilotti P, Bonnici JF, De Pasquier P, Portmann D, Bebear JP, Portmann, M., (1990) IgM against herpes viruses in Bell’s palsy. In: Castro, D., (ed) The facial nerve. Proceedings of the 6th international symposium. Kugler and Ghedini, Amsterdam, pp 221–223Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Formenti A, Galli M, Cocchini, F., (1985) Circulating immune complexes in idiopathic facial palsy. In: Portman M (ed) The facial nerve. Proceedings of the 5th international symposium. Masson, New York, pp 236–239Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Maños Pujol M Buendia E, Mestra, M., (1985) T-lymphocyte subpopulations in Bell’s palsy. In: Portmann M., (ed) The facial nerve. Proceedings of the 5th international symposium. Masson, New York, pp 197–202Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Maños Pujol M, Buendia E, Mestra, M., (1987) Cellular immune abnormalities in patients with recurrent Bell’s palsy. Clin Otolaryngol 12: 283–287CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Maños Pujol M, Sierra A, Buendia E, Mestre M, Maños Gonzalbo, M., (1990) Lymphoproliferative response to facial nerve extracts in patients with Bell’s palsy. In: Castro D., (ed) The facial nerve. Proceedings of the 6th international symposium. Kugler and Ghedini, Amsterdam, pp 339–342Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Formenti A, Galli M, Massetto, N., et al., (1990) Immunological aspects of Bell’s palsy. In: Castro D., (ed) The facial nerve. Proceedings of the 6th international symposium. Kugler and Ghedini, Amsterdam, pp 211–214Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Me Cabe, BF., (1979) Autoimmune sensorineural hearing loss. Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol 88: 585–589Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Kimura Y, Tojina H, Inamura, H., (1990) Stapedial reflex in patients with Bell’s palsy: comparison of SR with electroneurography. In: Castro, D., (ed) The facial nerve. Proceedings of the 6th international symposium. Kugler and Ghedini, Amsterdam, pp 369–372Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Yoo TJ, Floyd R, Ishibe T, Shea JJ, Bowman, C., (1985) Immunologic testing of certain ear diseases. Am J Otol 6: 96–100PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Ponzi S, Galli M, Formenti A, Castellani, C., (1988) T cell subsets in sudden hearing loss. Proceedings of the 1st European congress of otolaryngology, ParisGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Formenti
    • 1
  • M. Galli
    • 2
  • G. Termine
    • 1
  • M. Corbellino
    • 2
  • N. Massetto
    • 3
  1. 1.ENT DepartmentFatebenefratelli HospitalMilanItaly
  2. 2.Clinic of Infectious DiseasesUniversity of MilanItaly
  3. 3.Department of NeurologyS. Paolo HospitalMilanItaly

Personalised recommendations