An Animal Model of Ischemic Facial Palsy

  • T. Takeda
  • S. Takeda
  • K. Kozakura
  • H. Saito
Conference paper

Abstract

Although the pathogenesis of idiopathic facial palsy still remains to be settled, ischemia of the facial nerve is thought to be one of the most likely etiological factors. The intratemporal portion of the facial nerve receives blood supply from three major sources; that is, the internal auditory artery, the petrosal branch of the middle meningeal artery, and the stylomastid artery [1]. Of these arteries, the petrosal branch of the middle meningeal artery, the socalled petrosal artery, provides the main arterial supply to the geniculate ganglion, where the vascularity is much richer than elsewhere in the course of the facial nerve. Therefore, this artery seems to be a key to the solution of the pathogenesis of idiopathic facial palsy. In the preset study, we studied influences of interruption of the petrosal artery on the facial nerve.

Keywords

Ischemia Geni 

References

  1. 1.
    Blunt MJ (1954) The blood supply of the facial nerve. J Anat 88: 520–526PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Tashima K, Takeda T, Saito H et al. (1990) Antidromically evoked facial nerve responses in guinea pigs: a basis for clinical applications in patients with facial palsy. Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol 247: 151–155PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Takeda
    • 1
  • S. Takeda
    • 1
  • K. Kozakura
    • 1
  • H. Saito
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of OtolaryngologyKochi Medical SchoolKohasu, Oko-cho Nankoku, Kochi, 783Japan

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