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Optical Properties of Some New Fulleroids and Fullerene Polymers

  • A. Hassanien
  • T. Mrzel
  • P. Venturini
  • F. Wudl
  • D. Mihailovic
  • J. Gasperic
  • B. Kralj
  • D. Zigon
  • S. Milicev
  • A. Demsar
Part of the Springer Series in Solid-State Sciences book series (SSSOL, volume 117)

Abstract

Optical absorption and luminescence spectroscopy are performed on a number of new fulleroids with the aim of investigating the change in electronic properties as various functional groups are bonded to the molecule. The compounds studied include phenyl-, p-methylphenyl- and p- chlorophenyl fulleroids, as well as compounds produced by chemical and photo-polymerization. The bonding of additional groups appears to give rise to allowed transitions in the visible and U.V. Chemical or photo “polymerization” of C60 gives rise to an insoluble insulator with new absorption peaks and luminescence in the visible and UV, indicative of breaking of icosahedral symmetry.

Keywords

Luminescence Intensity Electronic Ionization Mass Spectroscopy Luminescence Spectroscopy Icosahedral Symmetry Record Mass Spectrum 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Hassanien
    • 1
  • T. Mrzel
    • 1
  • P. Venturini
    • 1
    • 4
  • F. Wudl
    • 4
  • D. Mihailovic
    • 1
  • J. Gasperic
    • 1
  • B. Kralj
    • 2
  • D. Zigon
    • 2
  • S. Milicev
    • 3
  • A. Demsar
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Solid State Physics, Josef Stefan InstituteUniversity of LjubljanaLjubljanaSlovenia
  2. 2.Department of Physical Chemistry, Josef Stefan InstituteUniversity of LjubljanaLjubljanaSlovenia
  3. 3.Department of Fluorine Chemistry, Josef Stefan InstituteUniversity of LjubljanaLjubljanaSlovenia
  4. 4.Institute for Polymers and Organic SolidsUniversity of CaliforniaSanta BarbaraUSA
  5. 5.Iskra ElektrooptikaLjubljanaSlovenia

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