Simulation and Optimization In Flow Planning and Management

  • David E. Winer
Conference paper
Part of the Transportation Analysis book series (TRANSANALY)

Abstract

Most of the aviation technical community is familiar with, “What if…”, the typical question associated with simulation modeling. A simulation normally evaluates a series of proposed action plans, or scenarios, in which a computer program mimics reality by stepping through all interacting events as they happen. What happens depends of course on suggested strategies being modeled. By analyzing the aftermath, by being abl’e to have a vision of what would happen should a scheme be implemented, planners can identify sensible solutions to problems. Computer simulation, by playing out a scenario to its end, can capture nearly all the complex interactions that would take place in real life, interactions too numerous to anticipate by routine thought processes. Thus figuratively, simulation provides a crystal ball view of the future that is beyond ordinary human insight.

Keywords

Transportation Radar Boulder Dispatch 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • David E. Winer
    • 1
  1. 1.Model Development DivisionOperations Research Service, U.S. Federal Aviation AdministrationUSA

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