Epidemiology of Cancer of the Oral Cavity and Oropharynx

  • A. Biörklund
  • J. Wennersberg
Part of the Recent Results in Cancer Research book series (RECENTCANCER, volume 134)

Abstract

At the present time, there are at least three programs in Europe aiming to reduce cancer mortality: the World Health Organization (WHO), the European Community (EC), and the Nordic Cancer Union are trying to reduce cancer mortality by 15% either in patients below 65 years or in all age groups. This aim may be achieved by different means: primary (prevention), secondary (early diagnosis), and tertiary (improved treatment). Among these primary prevention is often considered to have top priority, which anticipates that risk factors can be eliminated. For this purpose, cancer registration is the basis for national programs of cancer control. It gives information about the influence of preventive measures and cure rates.

Keywords

Chromium Europe Hydrocarbon Smoke Vinyl 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Biörklund
    • 1
  • J. Wennersberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of OtorhinolaryngologyUniversity HospitalLundSweden

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