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Analysis of Micronuclei and Microtubule Arrangement to Identify Aneuploidy-Inducing Agents in Cultured Mammalian Cells

  • F. Degrassi
  • C. Tanzarella
  • A. Antoccia
  • C. Pisano
  • A. Battistoni
Conference paper
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 72)

Abstract

The development of in vitro test methods to detect environmental agents that might induce aneuploidy is of crucial importance in genotoxicity testing.

Keywords

Mitotic Spindle Aspergillus Nidulans Chloral Hydrate Binucleated Cell Micronucleus Assay 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. Degrassi
    • 1
  • C. Tanzarella
    • 2
  • A. Antoccia
    • 2
  • C. Pisano
    • 1
  • A. Battistoni
    • 2
  1. 1.Centro di Genetica Evoluzionistica c/o Dipartimento di Genetica e Biologia MolecolareUniversità “La Sapienza”RomeItaly
  2. 2.Dipartimento di Genetica e Biologia MolecolareUniversità “La Sapienza”RomeItaly

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