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Incidence and Prognostic Significance of Immunophenotypic Subgroups in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: The Experience of the AIEOP Cooperative Study

  • G. Basso
  • R. Rondelli
  • M. C. Putti
  • A. Cantù Rajnoldi
  • D. Granchi
  • M. G. Cocito
  • M. Saitta
  • T. Santostasi
  • C. Guglielmi
  • A. Lippi
  • N. Santoro
  • M. G. Russo
  • A. Pession
  • M. Aricò
  • A. Biondi
Part of the Recent Results in Cancer Research book series (RECENTCANCER, volume 131)

Abstract

The role of immunological phenotype in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia’s (ALL) is important in classifying the different origins of ALL, but the identification of different subgroups of clinical relevance is still under discussion. In fact, frequent discrepancies are observed in the prognostic value of immunological subgroups in individual series. A poor outcome was seen in immunophenotype T in the first clinical studies (Greaves et al. 1981), but these results have not always been confirmed and now the T origin of ALL is not considered a prognostic factor (Hammond et al. 1986).

Keywords

Complete Remission Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Acute Leukemia Immunological Marker Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Basso
    • 1
  • R. Rondelli
    • 2
  • M. C. Putti
    • 1
  • A. Cantù Rajnoldi
    • 3
  • D. Granchi
    • 2
  • M. G. Cocito
    • 1
  • M. Saitta
    • 4
  • T. Santostasi
    • 5
  • C. Guglielmi
    • 7
  • A. Lippi
    • 8
  • N. Santoro
    • 6
  • M. G. Russo
    • 9
  • A. Pession
    • 2
  • M. Aricò
    • 10
  • A. Biondi
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsUniversity of PadovaPadovaItaly
  2. 2.Department of PediatricsUniversity of BolognaBolognaItaly
  3. 3.Department of PediatricsUniversity of Monta-MilanMilanItaly
  4. 4.Department of PediatricsUniversity of TurinTurinItaly
  5. 5.Department of PediatricsUniversity of Bari IBariItaly
  6. 6.Department of PediatricsUniversity of Bari IIBariItaly
  7. 7.Department of PediatricsUniversity of RomeItaly
  8. 8.Department of PediatricsUniversity of FlorenceFlorenceItaly
  9. 9.Department of PediatricsUniversity of CataniaCataniaItaly
  10. 10.Department of PediatricsUniversity of PaviaPaviaItaly

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