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Different Lipoprotein Patterns in Men and Women Examined by Coronary Angiography

  • H. Hahmann
  • D. Schätzer-Klotz
  • B. Klotz
  • D. Becker
  • T. Bunte
  • S. Kohring
  • H.-E. Keller
  • H. Schieffer
Conference paper
Part of the Recent Developments in Lipid and Lipoprotein Research book series (LIPID)

Summary

By usual clinical reasons 737 men and 280 women, mean age 59±10 years, were subjected in sequence to coronary angiography. We compared men and women concerning the relationship between their angiographic findings and lipoproteins as well as other risk factors.

In men and women with proven coronary artery disease (CAD) of same degree of severity we found different pattern of lipoproteins: Fe-male patients show higher levels of cholesterol (chol), low density lipoprotein chol (LDL-C) and high density lipoprotein chol (HDL-C) and lower ratios of chol/HDL-C and LDL-C/HDL-C . In women weight and age are higher, but they smoked less than men. Lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] levels are not different in men and women.

Discriminators of presence of CAD in female are 1st chol, 2nd; smoking, 3rd high Lp(a) levels and 4th diabetes mellitus; discriminators of early manifestation are 1st family history and 2nd smoking habits (discriminant analysis). In contrast to the findings in male, lipoprotein levels in young female with CAD are lower than in older female patients.

Differences could be caused by the considerable menopausal changes of lipoprotein pattern in women.

Keywords

Lipoprotein Level Stepwise Discriminant Analysis GENSINI Score Tungstophosphoric Acid Lipoprotein Pattern 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Hahmann
  • D. Schätzer-Klotz
  • B. Klotz
  • D. Becker
  • T. Bunte
  • S. Kohring
  • H.-E. Keller
  • H. Schieffer

There are no affiliations available

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