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Organization and Implementation of a Clonal Forestry Program

  • S. Strobl
  • R. W. Evers

Abstract

A successful large-scale operational clonal forestry program has evolved in eastern Ontario, Canada since 1975. The beginning of this program can be attributed to three main factors: (1) the demonstrated growth of improved hybrid poplar clones in field tests, (2) the developing wood supply shortage of a local pulp and paper mill, and (3) the availability of a large surplus of idle agricultural land suitable for reforestation with hybrid poplar.

Keywords

Hybrid Poplar Site Preparation Production Clone Hybrid Poplar Clone Clonal Forestry 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Strobl
  • R. W. Evers
    • 1
  1. 1.Fast Growing ForestsOntario Ministry of Natural ResourcesBrockvilleCanada

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