Advertisement

Thermal Modeling of Vascular Patterns and Their Impact on Interstitial Heating Technology and Temperature Monitoring

  • J. Mooibroek
  • J. Crezee
  • J. J. W. Lagendijk
Part of the Medical Radiology book series (MEDRAD)

Abstract

In interstitial hyperthermia we rely for temperature measurements on thermocouples placed either inside the catheter lumen and/or a limited distance from the catheters. It would be very helpful if this limited spatial temperature information could be extended through use of reliable thermal models to obtain and control the three-dimensional (3-D) temporal temperature distribution. Needless to say, these models could also be used for pretreatment planning purposes. A prerequisite of a thermal model for biological tissues is that it describes conductive and convective heat transport adequately, with emphasis on the latter as it has long been established that this is the predominant heat transfer mode. In nearly all papers on interstitial hyperthermia, the contribution of convective heat transport has been taken into account according to the proposal of Pennes (1948), i.e., the conventional bioheat transfer equation. However, consensus has been achieved (Valdagni et al. 1990) on the necessity of including at least a large vessel description as such vessels are important structures causing underdosage.

Keywords

Heat Transfer Coefficient Vascular Pattern Water Tube Countercurrent Vessel Heat Transfer Mode 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Chen MM, Holmes KR (1980) Microvascular contributions in heat transfer. Ann NY Acad Sci 335: 137–151PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Crezee J, Lagendijk JJW (1992) Temperature uniformity during hyperthermia: the impact of large vessels. Phys Med Biol 37(6): 1321–1337PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Lagendijk JJW (1984) A new theory to calculate temperature distributions in tissues, or why the “bioheat transfer” equation does not work. In: Overgaard J (ed) Hyperthermic oncology 1984. Taylor & Francis, London, pp 507–510Google Scholar
  4. Mooibroek J, Lagendijk JJW (1991) A fast and simple algorithm for the calculation of convective heat transfer by large vessels in three dimensional inhomogeneous tissues. IEEE Trans Biomed Eng 38: 490–501PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Pennes HH (1948) Analysis of tissue and arterial blood temperatures in the resting human forearm. J Appl Physiol 1: 93–122PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Valdagni R, Amichetti M, Antolini R et al. (1990) International consensus meeting on hyperthermia. Final Report. Int J Hyperthermia 6: 839–877PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Weinbaum S, Jiji LM (1985) A new simplified bioheat equation for the effect of blood flow on local average tissue temperature. ASME J Biomech Eng 107: 131–139CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Mooibroek
    • 1
  • J. Crezee
    • 1
  • J. J. W. Lagendijk
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of RadiotherapyUniversity Hospital UtrechtUtrechtThe Netherlands

Personalised recommendations