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Very High Homologous Temperature Constitutive Models for Semi-Solid and Solid Metals

  • S. Brown
  • P. Kumar
  • V. Dave
Conference paper
Part of the International Union of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics book series (IUTAM)

Summary

Although the constitutive behavior of metals is well characterized for homologous temperatures below one-half the melting temperature, very little data exist for very high homologous temperatures and semi-solid or mushy state constitutive behavior. The deformation processes at high homologous temperatures consist of some combination of dislocation glide and recovery-controlled creep, but it is not clear whether one particular process dominates and therefore which constitutive model is most appropriate. This investigation presents constitutive behavior for both very high homologous temperature deformation and semi-solid deformation processes. The experiments assume an internal variable formulation where the flow equation is coupled with the evolution of microstructure via a set of coupled, first order differential equations. The semi-solid model incorporates a single internal variable to capture the effect of solid particle agglomeration. The high homologous temperature behavior includes both steady state and transient data. Data is presented for both lead and lead/tin systems, illustrating the proper experiments to determine the material functions in the models.

Keywords

Constitutive Model Apparent Viscosity Volume Fraction Solid Constitutive Behavior Strain Rate Change 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    S B Brown, P Kumar, and V. Dave, “High Homologous Temperature Constitutive Behavior of FCC Metals” Constitutive Laws for Engineering Materials, ASME Press, pp. 871–875, 1990.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    S B Brown, “An Internal Variable Constitutive Model for Semi-Solid Slurries,” Proceedings, Fifth Conference on Modeling of Casting, Welding, and Advanced Solidification Processes, Davos, Switzerland, 1990.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    P A Joly, “Rheological Properties and Structure of a Semi-Solid Tin-Lead Alloy,” Ph.D. Thesis, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, M.I.T., 1974.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    N A Frankel and A Acrivos, “On the Viscosity of a Concentrated Suspension of Solid Spheres,” Chemical Engineering Science,” Vol. 22, 1967, pp. 847–853.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Brown
    • 1
  • P. Kumar
    • 1
  • V. Dave
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Materials Science and EngineeringMassachusetts Institute of TechnologyCambridgeUSA

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