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Physiological functions of vacuoles in yeast: Mechanism of sequestration of metabolites and proteins into vacuoles

  • Y. Ohsumi
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 69)

Abstract

Vacuoles are the largest compartment in yeast cells, occupying about 25% of the total cell volumes. Vacuoles contain mainly low molecular weight solutes and ions, but quite small amount of proteins. Recent studies revealed that vacuoles are not inert organelles as previously thought, but play important roles on maintaining homeostasis of cytosol in many respects. Last 15 years we have been making efforts to understand the structure and function of vacuoles in yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, by taking several different approaches, as described below.

Keywords

Vacuolar Membrane Proton Motive Force G6PDH Activity Nitrogen Free Medium Starvation Medium 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Y. Ohsumi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biology College of Arts and SciencesThe University of TokyoTokyoJapan

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