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Lecture 1: Global Observations Of Atmospheric Co2

  • Charles D. Keeling
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 15)

Abstract

The global carbon cycle consists of the geochemical reservoirs that store carbon on the earth and the pathways that transport carbon between them. With respect to annual through decadal time scales to be discussed here, the principal reservoirs of interest are the atmosphere, the oceans, and three land compartments consisting of land plants, their detritus, and soils, and called collectively the terrestrial biosphere. Rivers, lakes, and animals are of only marginal importance to the global carbon inventory, but they provide some of the pathways linking the terrestrial biosphere to the oceans and the atmosphere.

Keywords

Carbon Cycle Seasonal Cycle Fossil Fuel Combustion Terrestrial Biosphere Scripps Institution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charles D. Keeling
    • 1
  1. 1.Scripps Institution of OceanographyUniversity of California, San DiegoLa JollaUSA

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