Technology of ENDOR Spectrometers

  • Johann-Martin Spaeth
  • Jürgen R. Niklas
  • Ralph H. Bartram
Part of the Springer Series in Solid-State Sciences book series (SSSOL, volume 43)

Abstract

One straightforward approach to building an ENDOR spectrometer is to take a conventional EPR spectrometer, add the ability to produce a sufficiently high radio-frequency magnetic field in the microwave cavity, modulate this field, and then try to detect the change of the EPR signal, the ENDOR signal, with a lock-in amplifier. However, this will usually not work satisfactorily.

Keywords

Quartz Microwave Helium Radar Sine 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Johann-Martin Spaeth
    • 1
  • Jürgen R. Niklas
    • 1
  • Ralph H. Bartram
    • 2
  1. 1.Fachbereich PhysikUniversität-GesamthochschulePaderbornFed. Rep. of Germany
  2. 2.Department of PhysicsUniversity of ConnecticutStorrsUSA

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