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Chernobyl pp 43-59 | Cite as

Health Effects: Potential Long-Term Consequences in Europe

  • László Sztanyik
Chapter
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Part of the Springer Series on Environmental Management book series (SSEM)

Abstract

The discovery of a new type of radiation by W.C. Röntgen in 1895, called X rays, was very soon followed by the publication of numerous papers describing the potential and actual applications of the new technique. Almost simultaneously with these early uses, the first observations on the harmful effects of radiation in the human body were also made. Alopecia, the loss of hair following X-ray photography, was reported in 1896, about four months after Röntgen’s discovery. Other skin lesions were eloquently described by several authors about the same time. The earliest case of radiation-induced skin cancer was recorded in 1902 in a radiologist who had made X-ray diagnosis during the preceding years. As early as 1911, four cases of leukemia among radiologists were also reported and it was stated that long continued exposure to X rays might cause this disease. In the meantime, acute effects of radiation on internal organs including blood-forming tissues and the intestinal tract had also been observed.

Keywords

Thyroid Cancer International Atomic Energy Agency Chernobyl Accident Severe Mental Retardation Thyroid Dose 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Laxenburg/Austria 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • László Sztanyik
    • 1
  1. 1.Radiobiology and RadiohygieneFrédéric Joilot-Curie National Research InstituteBudapestHungary

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