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Extracellular Dyes Induce Photodegeneration and Photopermeabilization of Vertebrate and Invertebrate Neurones

  • S. Picaud
  • H. Wunderer
  • L. Peichl
  • N. Franceschini
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 58)

Abstract

Dyes can sensitize cells to light, resulting in lethal photodynamic damage (review: Spikes, 1989). Although dyes are widely used in neurobiology, their photosensitizing ability has not been investigated thoroughly on the nervous system but was only attested occasionally with electrophysiological techniques (review: Pooler, 1987). In some instances, however, the photodynamic action of dyes has been turned to advantage to produce photoinactivation of single neurones (Miller and Selverston, 1979) or of their neurites (Cohan et al, 1983; Jacob et Miller, 1985). To produce these effects, the dye was injected intracellularly into the neurone with a micropipette, the photoinactivation itself being subsequently achieved by a short pulse of laser light.

Keywords

Rose Bengal Lucifer Yellow Photodynamic Action Central Patch Cytoplasmic Labelling 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Picaud
    • 1
    • 2
  • H. Wunderer
    • 1
    • 3
  • L. Peichl
    • 2
  • N. Franceschini
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratoire de Neurobiologie, Equipe de NeurocybernétiqueCNRSMarseilleFrance
  2. 2.Max-Planck Institut für HirnforschungFrankfurt/M71Germany
  3. 3.Biologie 1Institut für Zoologie der UniversitätRegensburgGermany

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