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A General Purpose Fixed-Wing and Rotary-Wing Compressible Aerodynamics Analysis Method

  • Kadin Tseng
Conference paper

Summary

An existing boundary integral formulation for steady or unsteady subsonic flow for fixed-wing and rotary-wing applications is being recast into a form in which the wake and/or field influence is coupled into the linear Laplace solver through the boundary conditions. There are a number of advantages in using this approach. For instance, since the wake effect is “seen” as an induced velocity, any methodology that can provide this information may be used. From an engineering point of view, this is desirable for its flexibility and versatility. Furthermore, for transonic flow this formulation does not require a body-fitted field grid. This is of considerable advantage for flows around complex configurations. In addition, this new formulation is essentially based on the concept of velocity decomposition. Therefore, future extension to allow for viscous effects may be accomodated in a fairly straight-forward manner.

Keywords

Boundary Element Method Velocity Potential Subsonic Flow Transonic Flow Helmholtz Decomposition 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kadin Tseng
    • 1
  1. 1.United Technologies Research CenterEast HartfordUSA

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