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Biotechnology and Clonal Forestry

  • M. R. Ahuja

Abstract

Traditionally, forests have been regenerated from seedlings derived from bulked seed collected in nature, or more recently from seeds collected from randomly pollinated plus-trees. In most of these forests there is a large variation in growth, form, and vigor. Besides, there are forest tree species that are characterized by poor and irregular seed set, while in others the seed may be prone to genetic damage or rapid loss of viability. Clonal forestry has been practiced in Japan for centuries to establish Sugi (Cryptomeriajaponica) forests (Ohba, Chap. 4, Vol. 2), and in recent times in Germany and Sweden to establish Norway spruce (Picea abies) forests (Kleinschmit et al, Chap. 2; Bentzer, Chap. 6, Vol. 2), Eucalypts (Eucalyptus spp) in Brazil (Zobel, Chap. 7, Vol. 2), and radiata pine (Pinus radiata) in New Zealand (Gleed, Chap. 8, Vol. 2).

Keywords

Tree Species Somatic Embryo Somatic Embryogenesis Forest Tree Vegetative Propagation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. R. Ahuja
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Forest GeneticsFederal Research Centre for Forestry and Forest ProductsGrosshansdorfGermany

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