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Multiple Organ Failure: Is It Only Hypoxia?

  • F. B. Cerra
Part of the Update in Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine book series (UICM, volume 12)

Abstract

Multiple organ failure persists as a major cause of morbidity and mortality in surgical patients with a mortality rate in the 50–60% range and intensive care unit stays of three to four weeks or longer [1]. With the advent of modern Intensive Care Unit (ICU) care, the outcome improved. For the last several years, however, there has been no improvement in spite of better modes of ventilation, antibiotics, nutrition and metabolic support, gut decontamination, and better technology for the care of the critically ill and injured [2].

Keywords

Organ Failure Myocardial Blood Flow Multiple Organ Failure Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome Aerobic Glycolysis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

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  • F. B. Cerra

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