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Present Role of Corticosteroids as Antiemetics

  • M. S. Aapro
Part of the Recent Results in Cancer Research book series (RECENTCANCER, volume 121)

Abstract

Many agents used as antiemetics induce severe side-effects. This paradox reduces the rate at which we can control cancer chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. We need more effective agents and combinations thereof in this fight for a major goal in the quality of life of our patients. Indeed, total and not partial control of emesis is considered by most patients as the only clearly significant benefit from antiemetic treatment [1]. Should this goal not be achieved, many patients prefer antiemetic treatment giving minimal side-effects, such as with corticosteroids [2] or the recently developed serotonin (5HT3) receptor antagonists.

Keywords

Clin Oncol Antiemetic Effect Antiemetic Efficacy Anticipatory Nausea Methylprednisolone Sodium Succinate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. S. Aapro
    • 1
  1. 1.Division d’Onco-HématologieHôpital Cantonal UniversitaireGeneva 4Switzerland

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