A New Method for Assessment of Radiation Risk from Screening Mammography

  • S. A. Feig
Part of the Recent Results in Cancer Research book series (RECENTCANCER, volume 119)

Abstract

Although there is no direct evidence of breast cancer risk from low dose radiation exposure such as mammography (0.1 rad, mGy), this possibility has been raised because of the excess breast cancer incidence seen among populations that received much higher doses (100–2000 rad, 1–20 Gy). The risk from such high doses has been proven in studies of Japanese A–bomb survivors (Tokunaga et al. 1984a, 1984b, 1987; Shimizu et al. 1988), North American sanitoria patients who underwent multiple chest fluoroscopies during treatment for pulmonary tuberculosis (Boice and Monson 1977, Howe 1984) and women from New York (Shore et al. 1977, 1986) and Sweden (Baral et al. 1977) treated with radiation therapy for benign breast conditions. Evidence from these studies for increased risk from doses of less than 100 rads (1 Gy) is either absent or statistically weak (Feig 1984).

Keywords

Tuberculosis Oncol Kato Mastitis Fluoro 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. A. Feig
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Radiology, Breast Imaging CenterThomas Jefferson University HospitalPhiladelphiaUSA

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