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Cedar Wood Oil — Analyses and Properties

  • R. P. Adams
Part of the Modern Methods of Plant Analysis book series (MOLMETHPLANT, volume 12)

Abstract

Cedarwood oil is an important natural product for components used directly in fragrance compounding or as a source of raw components in the production of additional fragrance compounds. The oil is used to scent soaps, technical preparations, room sprays, disinfectants, and similar products, as a clearing agent for microscope sections, and with immersion lenses (Guenther 1952).

Keywords

Steam Distillation Ball Joint Sesquiterpene Hydrocarbon Linalyl Acetate Sesquiterpene Alcohol 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. P. Adams

There are no affiliations available

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