Advertisement

Phospholipid Derived Messengers

  • Wendy F. Boss
  • Abdul R. Memon
  • Qiuyun Chen
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 47)

Abstract

Since the discovery of the regulatory role of inositol phospholipids in animal cell signalling, there has been considerable interest in these inositol phospholipids as potential sources of second messengers in plants (Boss, 1989). In animal cells, the negatively charged phospholipid, phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2), is present in the plasma membrane and in response to external stimuli is cleaved by phospholipase C to produce the second messengers, inositol1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG) (Billah and Lapetina, 1983; Berridge and Irvine, 1984; Downes and Michell, 1985; Michell, 1986; Majerus et al., 1986; Berridge, 1987). DAG activates protein kinase C (Nishizuka, 1984) and IP3 releases calcium from non-mitochondrial intracellular stores (Streb et al., 1983) thus activating calcium-dependent enzymes.

Keywords

Plasma Membrane Fraction Inositol Trisphosphate Cell Wall Digestion Inositol Phospholipid Plasma Membrane ATPase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Anderson JM (1989) Membrane-derived fatty acids as precursors to second messengers. In: Boss WF, Morré DJ (eds) Second Messengers in Plant Growth and Development. Alan R. Liss, New York, pp 181–212Google Scholar
  2. Anderson RA, VT Marchesi (1985) Regulation of the association of membrane skeletal protein 4.1 with glycophorin by a polyphosphoinositide. Nature 318: 295–298PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Berridge MJ, RF Irvine (1984) Inositol trisphosphate, a novel second messenger in cellular signal transduction. Nature 312: 315–321PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Berridge MJ (1987) Inositol trisphosphate and diacylglycerol: Two interacting second messengers. Ann Rev Biochem 56: 159–193PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Billah MM, EG Lapetina (1983) Platelet-activating factor stimulates metabolism of phosphoinositides in horse platelets: Possible relationship to Ca2+ mobilization during stimulation. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 80: 965–968PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Billah MM, EG Lapetina (1982) Formation of lysophosphatidylinositol in platelets stimulated with thrombin or ionophore A23187. J Biol Chem 257: 5190–5200Google Scholar
  7. Blowers DP, AJ Trewavas (1989) Second Messenger: Their existence and relationship to protein kinases. In: WF Boss and DJ Morré (eds) Second Messengers in Plant Growth and Development. Alan R. Liss New York, pp 1–28Google Scholar
  8. Blowers DP, WF Boss, AJ Trewavas (1988) Rapid changes in plasma membrane protein phosphorylation during cell wall digestion. Plant Physiol 86: 505–509PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Blowers DP, AJ Trewavas (1988) Phosphatidylinositol kinase activity of a plasma membrane-associated calcium-activated protein kinase from peas. FEBS Lett 238: 87–89CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Boss WF, MO Massel (1985) Polyphosphoinositides are present in plant tissue culture cells. Biochem Biophysics Res Commun 132: 1018–1023CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Boss WF (1989) Phosphoinositide metabolism: Its relation to signal transduction in plants. In: Boss WF and DJ Morré (eds) Second Messengers in Plant Growth and Development. Alan R. Liss, New York, pp 29–56Google Scholar
  12. Brightman, AO, R Barr, FL Crane, DJ Morré (1988) Auxin-stimulated NADH oxidase purified from plasma membrane of soybean. Plant Physiol 86: 1264–1269PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Budde RJA, R Chollet (1988) Regulation of enzyme activity in plants by reversible phosphorylation. Physiol Plant 72: 435–439CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Budde RJA, Randall DD (1988) Protein kinases and future prospects. In: Morré DJ, Boss WF, Loewus FA, (ed) Inositol metabolism in plants. Allan R. Liss, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  15. Campbell CR, JB Fishman, RE Fine (1985) Coated vesicles contain a phosphatidylinositol kinase. J Biol Chem 260: 10948–10951PubMedGoogle Scholar
  16. Chauhan VPS, H Brocherholt (1988) Phosphatidylinositol-4,5bisphosphate may antecede diacylglycerol as activation of protein kinase C. Biochem Biophys Res Comm 155: 18–23PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Choquette D, E Hakim, AE Filoteo, EA Plishker, JR Bostwick, JT Penniston (1984) Regulation of plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPases by lipids of the phosphatidylinositol cycle. Biochem Biophys Res Comm 125: 908–915PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Collins CA, WW Wells (1983) Identification of phosphatidylinositol kinase in rat liver lysosomal membranes. J Biol Chem 258: 2130–2134PubMedGoogle Scholar
  19. Coté GG, MJ Morse, RC Crain, RL Satter (1987) Isolation of soluble metabolites of the phosphatidylinositol cycle from Samanea saman. Plant Cell Reports 6: 352–355CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Coté GG, LM Quarmby, RL Satter, MJ Morse, RC Crain (1988) Extraction, separation and characterization of the inositol phospholipid cycle. In: Morré DJ, Boss WF, Loewus FA, (eds) Inositol Metabolism in Plants. New York, Alan R LissGoogle Scholar
  21. Dengler LA, M Rincón, WF Boss (1988) NBD-PC: A tool to study endocytosis in plant protoplasts. In: Morré DJ, KE Howell, GMW Cook, WH Evans (eds) Cell-Free Analysis of Membrane Traffic. New York, Alan R LissGoogle Scholar
  22. Downes, CP, RH Michell (1985) Inositol phospholipid breakdown as a receptor-controlled generator of second messengers. In: Cohen P, MD Houslay (eds) Molecular Mechanisms of Transmembrane Signalling. Elsevier, Amsterdam, pp 3–56Google Scholar
  23. Dr¢bak BK, IB Ferguson, AP Dawson, RF Irvine (1988) Inosítolcontaining lipids in suspension cultured plant cells: An isotopic study. Plant Physiol 87: 217–222Google Scholar
  24. Einspahr KJ, TC Peeler, GA Thompson, Jr (1988) Rapid changes in polyphosphoinositide metabolism associated with the response of Dunaliella saliva to hyposmotic shock. J Biol Chem 263: 5775–5779PubMedGoogle Scholar
  25. Elliott DC, JD Skinner (1986) Calcium-dependent, phospholipid- activated protein kinase in plants. Phytochem 25: 39–44CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Elliott DC, YS Kokke (1987) Cross-reaction of a plant protein kinase with antiserum raised against a sequence from bovine brain protein kinase C regulatory sub-unit. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 145: 1043–1047PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Ettlinger C, L Lehle (1988) Auxin induces rapid changes in phosphatidylinositol metabolites. Nature 331: 176–178PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Favre B, G Turian (1987) Identification of a calcium-and phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase C) in Neurospora crassa. Plant Sci 49: 15–21Google Scholar
  29. Ferguson MAJ, AF Williams (1988) Cell-surface anchoring of proteins via glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol structures. Ann Rev Biochem 57: 285–320PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Gallagher S, TW Short, PM Ray, LH Pratt, WR Briggs (1988) Light-mediated changes in two proteins associated with plasma membrane fractions from pea stem sections. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 85: 8003–8007PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Grimes HD, WF Boss (1985) Intracellular calcium and calmodulin involvement in protoplast fusion. Plant Physiol 79: 253–258PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Harmon AC (1989) Lipid activated Protein Kinases. In: Morré DJ, Boss WF, Loewus FA, (eds) Inositol metabolism in plants. Alan R. Liss, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  33. Hartmann E, H Pfaffmann (1989) Mosses as a model system for involvement of phosphatidylinositol metabolism in signal transduction. In: DJ Morré, WF Boss, F Loewus (eds) Inositol Metabolism in Plants. Alan R. Liss, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  34. Hartmann E, H Pfaffmann (1989) Mosses as a model system for involvement of phosphatidylinositol metabolism in signal transduction. In: DJ Morré, WF Boss, F Loewus (eds) Inositol Metabolism in Plants. Alan R. Liss, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  35. Hartmann E, H Pfaffmann (1989) Mosses as a model system for involvement of phosphatidylinositol metabolism in signal transduction. In: DJ Morré, WF Boss, F Loewus (eds) Inositol Metabolism in Plants. Alan R. Liss, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  36. Jergil B, R Sundler (1983) Phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol in rat liver Golgi. J Biol Chem 258: 7968–7973PubMedGoogle Scholar
  37. Kiehl R, M Varsanyi, E Neumann (1987) Phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol associated with nicotinic acetylcholine receptor of Torpedo californica. Biochem Biophys Res Comm 147: 1251–1258PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Klucis E, GM Polya (1987) Calcium-dependent activation of two plant leaf calcium-regulated protein kinases by unsaturated fatty acids. Biochem Biophys Res Comm 147: 1041–1047PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Lassing I, U Lindberg (1988) Evidence that phosphatidylinositol cycle is linked to cell motility. Exp Cell Res 174: 1–15PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Lassing I, Lindberg U (1985) Specific binding between phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and profilactin. Nature 314: 472–474PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Leshem YY (1987) Membrane phospholipid catabolism and Cat+ activity in control of senescence. Physiol Plant 69: 551–559CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Lin SH, JN Fain (1985) Calcium-magnesium ATPase in rat hepatocyte plasma membranes: inhibition by vasopressin and purification of the enzyme. Prog Clin Biol Res 168: 25–30Google Scholar
  43. Lipsky JJ, PS Lietman (1980) Neomycin Inhibition of Adenosine triphosphatase: Evidence for a neomycin phospholipid interaction. Antimicrobial Agents and chemotherapy 18: 532–535Google Scholar
  44. Loewus FA, MW Loewus (1983) myo-Inositol: Its biosynthesis and metabolism. Annu Rev Plant Physiol 34: 137–161Google Scholar
  45. Low MG, PW Kincade (1985) Phosphatidylinositol is the membrane-anchoring domain of the thy-1 glycoprotein. Nature 318: 62–64PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  46. Low MG, AR Saltiel (1988) Structural and functional roles of glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol in membranes. Science 239: 268–275PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  47. Lucantoni A, GM Polya (1987) Activation of wheat embryo calcium-regulated protein kinase by unsaturated fatty acids in the presence and absence of calcium. FEBS Lett 221: 33–36CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  48. Macara, IG (1980) Vanadium-an element in search of a role. Trends in Biochem Sci 5: 92–94CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  49. Majerus PW, TM Connolly, H Deckmyn, TS Ross, TE Bross, H Ishii, VS Bansal, DB Wilson (1986) The metabolism of phosphoinositide-derived messenger molecules. Science 234: 1519–1526PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  50. Margolis BL, B Holub, DA Troyer, KL Skorecki (1988) Epidermal growth factor stimulates phospholipase A2 in vasopressintreated rat glomerular mesangial cells. Biochem J 256: 469–474PubMedGoogle Scholar
  51. Marthiny-Baron G, GFE Scherer (1988) A plant protein kinase and plant microsomal H+ transport are stimulated by the ether phospholipid. platelet-activating factor. Plant Cell Rep 7: 579–582CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  52. Melin PM, M Sommarin, AS Sandelius, B Jergil (1987) Identification of Cat+-stimulated polyphosphoinositide phospholipase C in isolated plant plasma membranes. FEBS Lett 223: 87–91PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  53. Melin PM, M Sommarin, AS Sandelius, B Jergil (1987) Identification of Cat+-stimulated polyphosphoinositide phospholipase C in isolated plant plasma membranes. FEBS Lett 223: 87–91PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  54. Michell RH (1986) Inositol lipids and their role in receptor function: History and general principles. In: Putney JW, Jr. (ed) Receptor Biochemistry and Methodology, Phosphoinositide and Receptor Mechanisms. Vol 7, Alan R Liss Inc, New York, pp 1–24Google Scholar
  55. Morré DJ (1989) Stimulus-response coupling in auxin regulation of plant cell elongation. In: Boss WF and DJ Morré (eds) Second Messengers in Plant Growth and Development. Alan R Liss, New York pp 29–56Google Scholar
  56. Morré DJ, B Gripshover, A Monroe, JT Morré (1984a) Phosphatidylinositol turnover in isolated soybean membranes stimulated by the synthetic growth hormone 2,4dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. J Biol Chem 259: 15364–15368PubMedGoogle Scholar
  57. Morré DJ, JT Morré RL Varnold (1984b) Phosphorylation of membrane located proteins of soybean in vitro and response to auxin. Plant Physiol 75: 265–268PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  58. Morré DJ, B Drobes, H Pfaffmann, FE Wilkinson, E Hartmann (1989) Diacylglycerol levels unchanged during auxin-stimulated growth of excised hypocotyl segments of soybean. Plant Physiol 90: 275–279PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  59. Morse MJ, RC Crain, GG Coté, RL Satter (1989a) Light-stimulated inositol phospholipid turnover in Samanea saman pulvini. Increased levels of diacylglycerol. Plant Physiol 89: 724–727Google Scholar
  60. Morse MJ, RC Crain, GG Coté, RL Satter (1989b) Light-signal transduction via accelerated inositol phospholipid turnover in Samanea saman pulvini. In: Morré DJ, WF Boss, FA Loewus (eds) Inositol Metabolism in Plants. Alan R Liss, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  61. Morse MJ, RC Crain, RL Satter (1987) Light-stimulated inositol phospholipid turnover in Samanea saman leaf pulvini. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 84: 7075–7078PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  62. Murthy WC, RF Irvine (1988) Phosphatidylinositol 4,5bisphosphate phosphodiesterase in higher plants. Biochem J. 249; 877–881Google Scholar
  63. Nishizuka Y (1984) Turnover of inositol phospholipids and signal transduction. Science 225: 1365–1370PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  64. Olah Z, Z Kiss (1986) Occurrence of lipid and phorbol ester activated protein kinase in wheat cells. FEBS Lett 195: 33–37CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  65. Palmgren MG, M Sommarin, P Ulvskov, PL Jorgenson (1988) Modulation of plasma membrane H+ ATPase from oat roots by lysophosphatidylcholine, free fatty acids and phospholipase A2. Physiologia Plantarum 74: 11–19CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  66. Peeler TC and GA Thompson, Jr (1989) Effects of light on inositol phospholipid metabolism in Dunaliella saliva. Plant Physiol 89S: 895CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  67. Pelech SL, DE Vance (1989) Signal transduction via phosphatidylcholine cycles. Trends in Biochem Sci 14: 29–30CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  68. Pfaffmann H, E Hartmann, AO Brightman, DJ Morré (1987) Phosphatidylinositol specific phospholipase C of plant stems: Membrane associated activity concentrated in plasma membranes. Plant Physiol 85: 1151–1155Google Scholar
  69. Ranjeva R, G Refeno, AM Boudet, D Marmé (1983) Activation of plant quinate:NAD 3-oxidoreductase by Cat+ and calmodulin. Proc Natl Acad Sci 80: 5222–5224PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  70. Ranjeva R, AM Boudet (1987) Phosphorylation of proteins in plants: regulatory effects and potential involvement in stimulus/response coupling. Annu Rev Plant Physiol 38: 73–93CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  71. Ranjeva R, A Carrasco, AM Boudet (1988) Inositol trisphosphate stimulates the release of calcium from intact vacuoles isolated from Acer cells. FEES Lett 230: 137–141CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  72. Reddy ASN, BW Poovaiah (1987) Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate induced calcium release from corn coleoptile microsomes. J Biochem 101: 569–573PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  73. Rincón M, Q Chen, WF Boss (1989) Characterization of inositol phosphates in carrot (Daucus carota L.) cells. Plant Physiol. 89: 126–132PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  74. Rincón M, Boss WF (1989) The second messenger role of Phosphoinositides. In: Morré DJ, Boss WF, Loewus FA, (eds) Inositol Metabolism in Plants. Alan R. Liss, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  75. Rincón M, WF Boss (1987) myo-Inositol trisphosphate mobilizes calcium from fusogenic carrot (Daucus carota L.) protoplasts. Plant Physiol 83: 395–398Google Scholar
  76. Saltiel, AR. JA Fox, P Sherline, N Sahyoun, P Cuatrecasas (1987) Purification of phosphatidylinositol kinase from rat brain myelin. Biochem J 241: 759–763PubMedGoogle Scholar
  77. Sandelius AS, DJ Morré (1987) Characteristics of phosphatidylinositol exchange activity of soybean microsomes. Plant Physiol 84: 1022–1027PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  78. Sandelius AS, M Sommarin (1986) Phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositols in isolated plant membranes FEBS Lett 201: 282–286Google Scholar
  79. Sandelius AS, M Sommarin (1989) Membrane-localized reactions involved in polyphosphoinositide turnover. In: Morré DJ, Boss WF, Loewus FA, (eds) Inositol Metabolism in Plants. Alan R Liss, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  80. Schäfer A, F Bygrave, S Matzenauer, D Marmé (1985) Identification of a calcium and phospholipid-dependent protein kinase in plant tissue. FEES Lett 187: 25–28CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  81. Schäfer M, G Behle, M Varsanyi, LMG Heilmeyer, Jr (1987) Cat+ regulation of 1- (3-sn-phosphatidyl) -1D-myo-inositol 4-phosphate formation and hydrolysis on sarcoplasmic-reticular Cat+-transport ATPase: A new principle of phospholipid turnover regulation. Biochem J 247: 579–587Google Scholar
  82. Scherer GFE, G Martiny-Baron, B Stoffel (1988) A new set of regulatory molecules in plants: A plant phospholipid similar to platelet activating factor stimulates protein kinase and proton-translocating ATPase in membrane vesicles. Planta 175: 241–253Google Scholar
  83. Schumaker KS, H Sze (1987) Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate releases Cat+ from vacuolar membrane vesicles of oat roots. J Biol Chem 262: 3944–3946PubMedGoogle Scholar
  84. Smith CD, WW Wells (1983) Phosphorylation of rat liver nuclear envelopes II. Characterization of in vitro lipid phosphorylation. J Biol Chem 258: 9368–9373Google Scholar
  85. Sommarin M, AS Sandelius (1987) Phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinases in plant plasma membranes. Biochim Biophys Acta 958: 268–278Google Scholar
  86. Stephenson M, PE Ryals, GA Thompson, Jr (1989) Fatty acid acylated proteins of the halotolerant alga Dunaliella saliva. Plant Physiol 90: 549–552PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  87. Strasser H, C Hoffman, H Grisebach, U Matern (1986) Are polyphosphoinositides involved in signal transduction of elicitor-induced phytoalexin synthesis in cultured plant cells? Z. Naturforsch 41c: 717–724Google Scholar
  88. Streb H, RF Irvine, MJ Berridge, I Schulz (1983) Release of Cat+ from a nonmitochondrial intracellular store in pancreatic acinar cells by inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate. Nature 306: 67–68PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  89. Torruella M, LM Casano, RH Vallejos (1986) Evidence of activity of tyrosine kinase(s) and of the presence of phosphotyrosine in pea plantlets. J Biol Chem 261: 6651–6653PubMedGoogle Scholar
  90. Varsanyi M, HG Tolle, LMG Heilmeyer, Jr, RMC Dawson RF Irvine (1983) Activation of sarcoplasmic reticular Ca21- transport ATPase by phosphorylation of an associated phosphatidylinositol. EMBO J 2: 1543–1548PubMedGoogle Scholar
  91. Wheeler JJ, Boss WF (1989) Inositol lysophospholipids. In: Morré DJ,Boss WF, Loewus FA, (eds) Inositol Metabolism in Plants. Alan R Liss, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  92. Wheeler JJ, WF Boss (1987) Polyphosphoinositides are present in plasma membrane from fusogenic carrot cells. Plant Physiol 85: 389–392PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  93. Whitman M, D Kaplan, T Roberts, L Cantley (1987) Evidence for two distinct phosphatidylinositol kinases in fibroblasts. Biochem J. 247: 165–174PubMedGoogle Scholar
  94. Zbell B, G Walter (1987) About the search for the molecular action of high affinity auxin-binding sites on membrane-localized rapid phosphoinositide metabolism in plant cells. In: KlAmbt D (ed) Plant Hormone Receptors. Springer-Verlag, Berlin pp 141–153CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wendy F. Boss
    • 1
  • Abdul R. Memon
    • 2
  • Qiuyun Chen
  1. 1.Department of BotanyNorth Carolina State UniversityRaleighUSA
  2. 2.Department of BiologyMiddle East Technical UniversityAnkaraTurkey

Personalised recommendations