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A Structural Analysis of the Gap Junctional Channel and the 16K Protein

  • Malcolm E. Finbow
  • Paul Thompson
  • Jeff Keen
  • Phillip Jackson
  • Elias Eliopolous
  • Liam Meagher
  • John B. C. Findlay
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 46)

Abstract

Membrane proteins have been the focus of much attention in recent years. Advances in the handling of membrane proteins, in protein sequencing technology and in molecular biology have been coupled with high resolution imaging techniques and chemical labelling studies. This has resulted in detailed pictures of a number of membrane proteins including the photoreaction centre (Huber, 1989), acetyl choline receptor (Unwin et al, 1988) and rhodopsin (Findlay & Pappin, 1986). The knowledge which has been gained from these proteins provides a useful framework for the analysis of the organisation of other membrane protein complexes.

Keywords

Fusion Pore Chromaffin Granule ATPase Complex Cell BioI Bovine Adrenal Medulla 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Malcolm E. Finbow
    • 1
  • Paul Thompson
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jeff Keen
    • 1
  • Phillip Jackson
    • 1
    • 2
  • Elias Eliopolous
    • 1
    • 3
  • Liam Meagher
    • 1
  • John B. C. Findlay
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Beatson Institute for Cancer ResearchGlasgowScotland
  2. 2.Departments of BiochemistryUniversity of LeedsLeedsUK
  3. 3.Departments of BiophysicsUniversity of LeedsLeedsUK

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