Progressive Restrictions in Gap Junctional Communication during Development

  • Florenci Serras
  • Jo A. M. van den Biggelaar
Conference paper
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 46)

Abstract

One of the most fascinating challenges in developmental biology is to elucidate the mechanisms that control the organization of the body plan during embryonic development. In this regard intercellular transduction of signals is of particular importance for a coordinated pattern of cell differentiation. Because of their ability to allow the exchange of ions and small molecules up to a molecular weight of about 1200 D (Simpson et al., 1977), gap junctions have been proposed as a putative pathway for the intercellular transfer of developmentally important signals (Furshpan and Potter, 1968). In most of the embryos so far studied gap junctions appear in the early stages of development, when important developmental decisions take place (see Caveney, 1985; Guthrie, 1987 for reviews). More striking results have shown that differences in junctional communication may be found between embryonic tissues with different developmental programmes. The changes of functional gap junctional communication between cells with divergent developmental fates suggest an involvement of gap junctional-mediated signal transduction in the specialization and organization of the different domains of the embryo (Van den Biggelaar, 1988).

Keywords

Permeability Dextran Fluorescein Rhodamine Prep 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Blennerhasset MG, Caveney S (1984) Developmental compartments are separated by a cell type with reduced junctional permeability. Nature 309: 361–364CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Caveney S (1985) The role of gap junctions in development. Annu Rev Physiol 47: 319–335PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Dale B, De Santis A, Ortolani G, Rassotto M, Santella L (1982) Electrical coupling of blastomeres in early embryos of ascidians and sea urchins. Exptl Cell Res 140: 457–461PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. De Laat SW, Tertoolen LGJ, Dorresteijn AWC, Van den Biggelaar JAM (1980) Intercellular communication patterns are involved in cell determination in early molluscan development. Nature 287: 546–548PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Dorresteijn AWC, Van den Biggelaar JAM, Bluemink JG, Hage WJ (1981) Electron microscopical investigations of the intercellular contacts during the early cleavage stages of Lymnaea stagnalis. Roux’s Arch Dev Biol 190: 215–220CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Dorresteijn AWC, Bilinski SM, Van den Biggelaar JAM, Bluemink JG (1982) The presence of gap junctions during early Patella embryogenesis: An electron microscopical study. Dev Biol 91: 397–401PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Dorresteijn AWC, Wagemaker HA, De Laat SW, Van den Biggelaar JAM (1983) Dye-coupling between blastomeres in early embryos of Patella vulgata (Mollusca, Gastropoda ): Its relevance for cell determination. Roux’s Arch Dev Biol 192: 262–269Google Scholar
  8. Finbow ME, Buultjens TEJ, Serras F, Kam E, John S, Meagher L (1988) Immunological and biochemical analysis of the low molecular weight gap junctional proteins. In: Hertzberg EL, Johnson RG (eds) Modem Cell Biology Vol 7, pp 53–67. Alan R Liss, Inc, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  9. Fraser SE, Green CR, Bode HR, Gilula NB (1987) Selective disruption of gap junctional communication interferes with a patterning process in hydra. Science 237: 49–55PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Fraser SE, Green CR, Bode HR, Bode PM, Gilula NB (1988) A perturbation analysis of the role of gap junctional communication in developmental patterning. In: Hertzberg EL, Johnson RG (eds) Modem Cell Biology Vol 7, pp 515–526. Alan R Liss, Inc, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  11. Furshpan EJ, Potter DD (1968) Low-resistance junctions between cells in embryos and tissue culture. In: Moscona AA, Monroy A (eds) Current topics in developmental biology, Vol 3 pp 95127 Academic Press New YorkGoogle Scholar
  12. Georges D (1979) Gap and tight junctions in tunicates. Study in conventional and freeze-fracture techniques. Tiss Cell 11: 781–792CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Guthrie SC (1987) Intercellular communication in embryos. In: De Mello WC (ed) Cell to cell communication. pp 223–244 Plenum Press, New YorkCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Harris AL, Spray DC, Bennett MVL (1983) Control of intercellular communication by voltage dependence of gap junctional conductance. J Neurosci 3: 79–100PubMedGoogle Scholar
  15. Kalimi GH, Lo CW (1988) Communication compartments in the gastrulating mouse embryo. J Cell Biol 107: 241–255PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Kimmel CB, Spray DC, Bennett MVL (1984) Developmental uncoupling between blastoderm and yolk cell in the embryo of the teleost Fundulus. Dev Biol 102: 483–487PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Knier JA, Merritt MW, White RL, Bennett MVL (1986) Voltage dependence of junctional conductance in ascidian embryos. Biol Bull 171: 495Google Scholar
  18. Kuhtreiber WM, Van Dongen CAM (1989) Microinjection of lectines, hyaluronidase and hyaluronate fragments interferes with cleavage deley and mesoderm induction in embryos of Patella vulgata. Dcv Biol 132: 436–441CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Lane N, Dallai R, Burighel P, Martinucci GB (1986) Tight and Gap junctions in the intestinal tract of tunicates (Urochordata): a freeze-fracture study. J Cell Sci 84: 1–17PubMedGoogle Scholar
  20. Lo CW, Gilula NB (1979) Gap junctional communication in the post-implantation mouse embryo. Cell 18: 411–422PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Lo CW (1988) Communication compartments in insect and mammalian development. In: Hertzberg EL, Johnson RG (eds) Modem Cell Biology Vol 7, pp 505–514. Alan R Liss, Inc, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  22. Loewenstein WR (1981) Junctional intercellular communication: The cell to cell membrane channel. Phyciol Res 61 (4): 829–913Google Scholar
  23. Knier JA, Bennett MVL (1986) Communication compartments in ascidian embryos at the blastopore stage. Biol Bull 171: 474Google Scholar
  24. Michalke W (1977) A gradient of diffusible substances in a monolayer of cultured cells. J Memb Biol 33: 1–20CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Miyazaki S, Takahashi K, Tsuda K, Yoshii M (1974) Analysis of non linearity observed in the current-voltage relation of the tunicate embryo. J Physiol 238: 55–77PubMedGoogle Scholar
  26. Nishida H, Satoh N (1985) Cell lineage analysis in ascidian embryos by intracellular injection of a tracer enzyme.II. The 16- and 32-cell stages. Dev Biol 110: 440–454PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Pitts JD, Finbow ME (1986) The gap junction. J Cell Sci Supp14: 239–266Google Scholar
  28. Serras F, Van den Biggelaar JAM (1987) Is a mosaic embryo also a mosaic of communication compartments?. Dev Biol 120: 132–138PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Serras F, Kuhtreiber WM, Krul MRL, Van den Biggelaar JAM (1985) Cell communication compartments in molluscan embryos. Cell Biol Int Rep 9: 731–736PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Serras F, Buultjens TEJ, Finbow ME (1988a) Inhibition of dye-coupling in Patella (Mollusca) embryos by microinjection of antiserum against Nephrops ( Arthropoda) gap junctions. Exptl Cell Res 179: 282–288PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Serras F, Baud C, Moreau M, Guerrier P, Van den Biggelaar JAM (1988b) Intercellular communication in the early embryo of the ascidian Ciona intestinalis. Development 102: 55–63Google Scholar
  32. Serras F, Dictus WJAG, Van den Biggelaar JAM (1989a) Changes in junctional communication in relation with cell cycle arrest and differentiation of trochoblasts in embryos of Patella vulgata. Dev Biol (in press)Google Scholar
  33. Serras F, Damen P, Dictus WJAG, Notenboom RGE, Van den Biggelaar JAM (1989b) Communication compartments in the ectoderm of embryos of Patella vulgata. Roux’s Archiv Dev Biol (in press)Google Scholar
  34. Sheridan JD (1987) Cell Communication and growth. In: De Mello WC (ed) Cell to Cell communication, pp 187–222. Plenum Press, New YorkCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Simpson I, Rose B, Loewenstein WR (1977) Size limit of molecules permeating the junctional membrane channel. Science 195: 294–296PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Takahashi K, Yoshii M (1981) Development of the sodium, calcium and potassium channels in the cleavage arrested embryo of an ascidian. J Phisiol 315: 515–529Google Scholar
  37. Van den Biggelaar JAM (1977) Development of dorsoventral polarity and mesentoblast determination in Patella vulgata. J Morphol 154: 157–186PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Van den Biggelaar JAM, Guerrier P (1979) Dorsovcntral polarity and mesentoblast determination as concomitant results of cellular interactions in the mollusk Patella vulgata. Dev Biol 68: 462–471PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Van den Biggelaar JAM (1988) Intercellular communication and development. In: Hertzberg EL, Johnson RG (eds) Modem Cell Biology Vol 7, pp 469–471. Alan R Liss, Inc, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  40. Van den Biggelaar JAM, Serras F (1988) Determinative decisions and dye-coupling changes in the molluscan embryo In: Hertzberg EL, Johnson RG (eds) Modem Cell Biology Vol 7 pp 483493. Alan R Liss, Inc, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  41. Verdonk NH, Cather JN (1983) Morphogenetic determination and differentiation. In: Verdonk NH, Van den Biggelaar JAM, Tompa AS (eds) The Mollusca Vol 3, pp 215–252 Academic Press, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  42. Verdonk NH, Van den Biggelaar JAM (1983) Early development and the formation of the germ layers. In: Verdonk NH, Van den Biggelaar JAM, Tompa AS (eds) The Mollusca Vol 3, pp 91–122 Academic Press, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  43. Warner AE, Lawrence PA (1982) Permeability of gap junctions at the segmental border in insect epidermis. Cell 23: 247–252Google Scholar
  44. Weir MP, Lo CW (1984) Gap-junctional communication compartments in the Drosophila wing imaginal disk. Dev Biol 102: 130–146PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. Wolpert L (1978) Gap junctions: channels for communication in development. In: Feldman J, Gilula NB, Pitts JD (eds) Intercellular junctions and synapses. pp 81–96 Wiley, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  46. Yamasaki H (1988) Role of gap junctional communication in malignant cell transformation. In: Herzberg El, Johnson RG (eds) Modem Cell Biology Vol 7, pp 449–465. Alan R. Liss, Inc, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  47. Zalokar M, Sardet C (1984) Tracing of cell lineage in embryonic development of Phallusia mammillata ( Ascidia) by vital staining of mitochondria. Dev Biol 102: 195–205PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Florenci Serras
    • 1
  • Jo A. M. van den Biggelaar
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Experimental ZoologyUniversity of UtrechtUtrechtThe Netherlands

Personalised recommendations