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Protein Kinase C in Neuronal Cell Growth and Differentiation

  • J. F. Kuo
Conference paper
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 43)

Abstract

Protein kinase C (PKC) system is particularly predominant in nervous tissue compared to other tissues as indicated by a high level of the enzyme activity (Kuo et al., 1980) or amount (Girard et al., 1986; Yoshida et al., 1988) and by an abundant occurrence of its substrate proteins (Wrenn et al., 1980). It is likely, therefore, that PKC plays a pivotal role in neuronal function and regulation. In this chapter, I summarized some of our work on immunocytochemical localization of PKC and phosphorylation of endogenous proteins in brain and neuroblastoma cells as they are related to development and differentiation.

Keywords

Purkinje Cell Neurite Outgrowth Myelin Basic Protein Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis Dependent Protein Kinase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. F. Kuo
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PharmacologyEmory University School of MedicineAtlantaUSA

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