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Chest Diseases of Elderly Women Due to Domestic Cooking and Passive Smoking: The Cracow Study

  • W. Jedrychowski
  • B. Tobiasz-Adamczyk
  • E. Mróz
  • J. Ceçek
Part of the International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health Supplement book series (OCCUPATIONAL)

Abstract

Numerous epidemiological studies have demonstrated an association between outdoor air pollution or urban residence and the occurrence of chronic chest symptoms. Comparing the results of the studies on chest problems among children it was suggested that not the polluted nature of urban air is the main and single factor causing the excess in morbidity from chronic bronchitis in population, but indoor air pollution (domestic heating or passive smoking) may play a very important role in the etiology of chronic nonspecific chest diseases.

Keywords

Chronic Cough Passive Smoking Cooking Time Chest Disease Chest Symptom 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Jedrychowski
  • B. Tobiasz-Adamczyk
  • E. Mróz
  • J. Ceçek

There are no affiliations available

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