Oxygen Transport and Oxygen Uptake on the Summit of Mount Everest

  • J. B. West
Conference paper

Abstract

Why go to the trouble, time, and expense of organizing a medical research ex pedition to the summit of Mount Everest? The reason is an interest in how the human body tolerates extreme oxygen deprivation. Every physician who works in the intensive care environment, or sees patients with severe lung disease, knows that a common problem is severe hypoxemia. Our hope was that by looking at normal man under conditions of extremely severe oxygen lack, we could better understand how a patient can tolerate the hypoxemia of severe lung disease.

Keywords

Dioxide Dehydration Bicarbonate Lime Expense 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. B. West

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